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CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 1:00am EDT
>> america a university professor naomi baron is technology changing how we communicate? >> guest: yes and no. there is the assumption that technologies of computers and now mobile phones change the ways that we've right to each other because he supposedly huge use emoticons and abbreviations that we are not using that many but if maybe if you are using a lot if you are a young teenage girl but these kind of better commonly used and not as many as the press with the dust to believe but what is changing is the ways in which we read or write but our social relationships are changing and all also personal and individual psyches. >> host: walk us through those four things. >> guest: how we read. what is clear what you see on the screen with a laptop or the tablet computers or mobile phone or e-reader you don't do it the same way as a hard copy. that is the subject of the next book. i am doing research. but you tend to skim or the find function just zeroing in on the word and you look at the little snippet of what was written and ignore the concept. but we do know that when you read a
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 2:45pm EDT
we've got to change the structure because we are killing the very things that made us great. i wrote this book, not anything i hope to get out of it. i hope to awaken people to what happened. we can have that going on. what do they look like? >> well, hank greenberg, truly an icon of american dismissed. this book, "the aig story" is a must-read for those who are can learn and care that he had tended consequences of governmental regulation of industry, particularly financial institution in the future of the american economy. thank you for coming today. [applause] >> now ian morris looks at the development of civilizations of the past 15,000 years and uses current measurement for human development to explain what the center for advancement due from the east to the west. this is an hour and 15. >> good evening. i am heidi hsu, president of world affairs council washington and it's my pleasure to welcome me to the world affairs council domain of world affairs today. thank you for joining us for a discussion with ian morris, author of "the measure of civilization." ian morris is a p
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 1:25pm EDT
social change. my background is as a public defender. this seems to me that communication is the vehicle to awareness, education, and to move public opinion to the opinion in the direction of what i am considering a more enlightened point of view. >> guest: in your book to use any of your cases, public defender cases as examples? >> none of the cases i've worked on while i was in the public defender's office made it this far. but i do write about cases that i think have a chance to study, had a chance to talk to the lawyers and had a chance to talk to some individuals involved, a family member to family members of the journalists, so they don't come from my personal experience, but a lot of in-depth study. >> host: that change in dna technology, is that beneficial to defendants? >> guest: yes, it can be. a fellow who is on the jacket of my book, it very aptly named individual. the first person exonerated from death row across the country. 1993. first-person exonerating based on dna. and it came to him as he was reading a mystery novel about dna being used to mail certain. if that could b
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 8:15pm EDT
because while times and technology and many things have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those who speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today governor jeb bush understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remained an extremely important national voice in the republican party. as we prepare to welcome the governor to the stage, let's first take stock and a handful of issues that we know where of vital importance to ronald reagan and square them up against the words and deeds of jeb bush on the same critical topics today. what are the fundamental issues? we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut taxes for the average american. he was convinced that it was the man or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than the federal government and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. governor jeb bush was in office he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk abut the size of government. ronald re
CSPAN
Mar 9, 2013 9:00pm EST
change of regulation in the united states. i said a foot fall is like a murder charge, trying to explain the severity of the change in the regulatory environment. it did change. sarbanes-oxley brought about enormous change in corporate governance, and companies felt vulnerable, and so they all went to their own lawyer representing them, and what happened is that ceos of companies were really downgradeed in the management of an institution. in some cases, it may have been good. many many cases, it was nod got. when a board is trying to really run a company that's operating in 10 countries where the management knows moment to moment what's going on directors come, you know, four times a year, and no matter how dill janet they are, it's rather difficult for them to have a detailed knowledge of what it is to take to run that company. the management of aig traveled constantly, on the road constantly, and regional executives, the reporting was on a realtime basis. i could tell aig results by two days. i would know anything i wanted to know about the company. it was a realtime basis, so
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 1:45pm EDT
outside people obviously and some very fine people of the time. all of that change -- to the first part of the book we touch on that. well we meant to the country overall. a couple of vignettes of this that all talk about briefly. a book written on something. a book about a russian sub that went down in the northwest pacific the russians to know where was. they wanted to recover it. code books were important. the technology was important. it was decided they would try and recover. the median my apartment, the general counsel of the cia, is deputy, the deputy of howard hughes. a very large vessel to hold in the center that would scoop this up. then you had to think about what if the russians decided what we were doing was looking for the submarine. what would happen if they fired on us? could not bring this tool id. we knew. put it on the beach. that was not going to work. so we had to take the pacific islands that was obviously in the european position. bill the report. we provided the insurance without operation. there are many gabonese that have the vision was still, the underwri
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 8:00am EDT
astonishing insights that blackett's small team proved early on changed their minds. probably dramatic was a calculation the scientists made showing that the tactics the navy had orders its air crews to follow in attacking u-boats -- even though it seems like a perfectly sensible approach on its face -- was, in fact, unlikely ever successful in sinking a u-boat. the navy commanders had actually done a somingly reasonable calculationing themselves. -- seemingly reasonable calculation themselves. they knew how much time typically elapsed between the moment a patrol plane spotted a u-boat and the u-boat spotted the patrol plane and dove beneath the surface. they knew how fast a u-boat could dive. they knew it was of 45 seconds that a u-boat had been out of sight by the time the patrol plane got into position to develop a depth charge, and they figure a u-boat could have gotten to about 150 feet below the surface at that point. so they said, okay, 150 feet, that's the best average. the trouble was, as blackett's scientists realized once they started sifting through this data, was
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 3:00pm EST
moral authority. you think about that. the peak of their influence, changing the world. this whole idea of leadership was challenged. you can even argue if you look at this that after they formalized this, they actually lost a little bit and you can argue about the influence. it got me thinking about the world of elected officials that have this formal authority. >> you haven't done time, have you? >> no, i have not done time. but this idea that we have to wait around for the white horse. i have been waiting around and somewhere expecting it was arnold schwarzenegger. he married maria shriver, that was good, then he got in and president obama had been under that notion to the notion that we had to wait around for someone else to solve our problems. it got me walking down this path. what is happening with these popular movement here in america, occupy movement, the tea party, et etc. there is an energy out there. >> we are talking about estonia, south korea, a lot of people in search of innovation at the head of what we have. they're places throughout the globe that have a learning curve
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 4:45pm EDT
much. it's a pleasure to be here. welcome. big data is going to change how we live, work and think, and our journey begins with a story, and the story begins with the flu. every year the winter flu kills tens of thousands of people around the world, but in 2009 a new virus was discovered, and experts feared it might kill tens of millions. there was no vaccine available. the best health authorities could do was to slow its spread. but to do that, they needed to know where it was. in the u.s. the centers for disease control have doctors report new flu cases, but collecting the data and analyzing it takes time. so the cdc's picture of the crisis was always a week or two behind. which is an eternity when a pandemic is underway. around the same time, engineers at google developed an alternative way to predict the spread of the flu. not just nationally, but down to regions in the united states. they used google searches. now, google handles more than three billion searches a day and saves them all. google took 50 million of the most common-searched terms that americans use and compared w
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 12:45pm EDT
particularly on the theme of social justice and wanting the kind of change that will be better for society and nice to be here in the union and i very much appreciate also the sponsorship of ireland, which i'm very familiar with, a place i have many times visited and enjoyed. it is home for a lot of reasons and i appreciate the fact that you braved the elements and yesterday with such a beautiful day and what happened today that can change so dramatically and so quickly? as i say i feel very at home because i had an early experience of learning about human rights, very early and growing up in the west of ireland, the only girl wedge between four brothers, older than me and two youngsters and me of course i had to be more interest in human rights and equality but using my elbows and generally asserting myself but as i tried to explain in the book because it is good to record, that wasn't the norm. the ireland i was growing up in was and ireland where girls and women knew their place, their place was in the home or in the nunnery or if they were talented enough they could become writers or a
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 7:45pm EDT
one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only copy though perhaps al gore cannot really be retained copies for their files, too. i'm sure earlier tests photocopied by the civil rights division for the benefit of the price lawyers. that group made a stiff wire tape. the supreme court ad
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 11:15pm EDT
results. >> we talk about student vouchers how did you come to the changing our thinking on this interesting topic? >> this topic of felch terse hawk in dove gets people riled up. you want to have a debate you bring up the word of voucher and people have very strong opinions. i am a democrat. i spent my entire life since i was in the second grade and i said what's the difference between a republican and democrat he said democrats care more about, you know, the people that have less and republicans want to make money to the i said well i am a democrat. and i have been ever since. and so when i got to d.c. what education reform should look like and what it shouldn't and where i drew a bright line on the vouchers because in the democratic party we think they are bad because you are taking money away from the schools that need it the most and only helping a few kids. when i arrived in washington, we had a publicly funded voucher program, and people -- it was about to be free authorized and people wanted me to lehane monegan you are the top education official. what do you think about
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 6:00pm EDT
was not an easy thing to do because that is going to change some. there are going to be some people who see us, see me in particular as having taken sides. so i often get asked why did you do this? and i think the fact is for both of us we spent 40 years building some capital and a reputation and they're comes a point you feel like you need to use that capital because the stakes are too high, the consequences are great, and we both believe that we are had a really critical point in this political system. we face huge problems in the country. short term and long term. and if we are going to leach the system of problem solvers and in up with people who say things like richard murdock, the new republican nominee for the senate in indiana said yesterday which is my idea of compromise is on the move to accept my position. if that is how we are going to be faced with making policy decisions that are going to be very tough and painful for americans as all major changes in social policy whether the expanded government or contract government do they disrupt people's lives almost by definitio
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2013 8:00pm EDT
think random pain when is a good name? that is what got you in trouble. these are changing times but the importance of storytelling will never change so i will remain cautiously terrified optimistic. [laughter] >> if we went down the dark ages we may have thought this guy was falling since the dawn of time there is stuff we just don't understand and things change. i can tell you how many devices i put my phone numbers and since 1978 and now i cannot remember. some changes, hopefully our health is the most important. it is scary. we don't know. when i was in first grade we would go outside in the hallway with duck and cover. so i am optimistic about the human race and on the day to day basis it annoys me but i think writing is the highest form of transcendence that we have. it is still the thought that counts. >> i cannot tell you how many times i am on a panel about the future of the printed word and there are seats full and people turn out to for this and that gives me optimism. we will survive. the platform if it is the printed word i'd go with the might daughters to on walden
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 11:30am EDT
the forthcoming book, if mayors ruled the world more should be -- climate change, immigration, and terrorism. this is just under two hours. [applause] thank you so much, kathy. it's a particular pressure, as you might imagine, to have the hospitality of a distinguished center at the graduate center, the center on philanthropy andsivity society, and to also have it with a friendship of a terrific scholar who has been a friend for many years. i owe kathy a special debt in her generous invitation to me to be a senior scholar at the center and bring my small organization with me. thankthank you very much, kathy. it's because of her that i am here today, and here this fall and winter and at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland, having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again, but i'm very glad i broke that promise to myself and that i'm here. it's also a pleasure to be once again on the podium with francis fox piven. we met in the '70s when we were both regarded, even i was regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think it anyone. we were asked by jame
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2013 10:00am EDT
time again with casey, with dozenless, with carhart that laws alone without context will not change people's behavior. no offense to the attorneys in the room. but laws themselves do not change people's minds. nothing -- probably nothing that harry plaqueman -- blackman or samuel alito has written is enough to make someone say, oh, okay, i'll do what they say. it's having these ways to change minds is through learned experience, through lived experience, through empathy and through being able to go deeper into conversation and getting beyond the assumptions and beyond the stereotypes about why people access this health service. i had a, i did a radio interview earlier today where the host,-very libertarian and very progressive, asked me what do you think of the people who say, oh, women just use abortion for birth control. i said, well, i think anyone who says that demonstrates how little they know about abortion, how little they know about birth control for that matter too. but these are common assumptions. people do still think this. people who do not flat out disapprove of the ri
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 11:45am EDT
history with special prosecutors that changed my mind and converted me to the prospective, the view by the way that is laid out in justice scalia's descent. it was a recognition that the constitution is an appeal to function as a claim that something else would be better than the constitution. that may or may not be true, but it isn't an admissible argument about the structure that we have and that is today's prevailing view. they can claim credit for bringing about that change in our jurisprudence. i've gone on too long but i can't close with one vignette from the post solicitor general. you remember he was locked during the 1987 hearings he wanted to be on the court because it would be an intellectual feast. that sounded like the ivory tower by you probably don't remember the rest of his answer. the book sets out and i quote i would like to leave a reputation as a judge that understood the constitutional governments and contributed his bit to the ways the five described in the committee. the constitutional structure is the most important thing this nation has and i would like to maintain
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 9:15pm EDT
and education reporting specifically, is that one. sometimes journalism does change policy for the better in very specific and concrete way small but i think there is something to be said for journalism that permanently complicates or maybe even just momentarily interrupts our understanding of the world we live in. i cannot say that all or even most of the riding that i have done has accomplished that goal, but it is something to aspire to a least. before i go any further, i want to thank the people who let me write about their lives, particularly steward and a mother. it is a teacher and administrator. it was not only i opening to spend time with them, but also a lot of fun at times. i feel privileged. just a brief word about them, people who know marry laurie know that she was always at perry walker a school. you drive by and on weekends commander car is out in front. you drive by at night in a car is out front. you drive by on holidays and a karzai front. yet somehow despite all she does she found time to spend many sunday mornings of me talking about her working life. i used to
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2013 11:00pm EST
we cannot deny the contours' of the change already taking place in your world, the media, a block the newspapers, it is obvious now in hindsight but the music industry and tell monetized saying you're not buying albums in the more we have a wonderful debate about my digitation and flipping feta classroom to expand the classroom. >> host: forgive me, as the governor on the board, in terms of treating citizenship with young people the responsibility of the institutions and colleges? >> guest: i have a three and a half year-old daughter, you all had this experience, she pulled out my phone and i am mesmerized she discovers things i did not know existed. i feel she is a prodigy. >> host: when she and estonia? [laughter] >> guest: then one year ago they start early with pre-preschool in every single one maybe there were not prodigy's but wired differently. the evolution the you cannot educate my daughter like i was educated. the generation of choice you cannot have a row of desks and a bell ringing during ben franklin's time with single subjects in teachers and a mass education environ
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 4:20pm EST
limited, you can only run for one term. >> are they going to ever change that? does the public understand how that limits their -- [inaudible] >> i think you could probably -- [inaudible] >> actually, the answer i learned is that you have to -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> still? in this case i'm glad considering that kind of job. how. >> you? -- how are you? nice to see you. good to see you again. >> thank you for coming. [inaudible conversations] >> that's going to happen. >> i work with bonnie. good to see you. >> thank you. thank her. >> how are you gavin? how are you? >> good. [inaudible conversations] picking your brain tonight. i get the scoop, the whole thing off the record. get her a few glasses of wine -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> we have to do something. >> well, congratulations. >> thank you. on -- >> on your book. i saw you this morning. >> oh, did you? on morning joe? you were up early. i've got to defend these tax increases. i've been on every show -- >> i know. [inaudible conversations] >> it's unbelievable. i'm impressed how you keep
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 5:00pm EST
until 2008. what change during that time. >> i always find that out at shows how gun control can work. very serious restrictions on non. >> all of our gun massacres, none have been committed with a fully automatic weapon. but what happened, you had the firearms act and importantly the 1960s have been. the racial turbulence of the 60s and the assassination of president kennedy, his brother, martin luther king eventually produced another gun control act. there was support for that and even in the leadership of the nra at the time. charlton heston subscribe to a statement that was read by another hollywood tough guy calling for some kind of regulation to prevent this repetition of the assassinations. they think like a lot of gun control measures comely support them in california. ronald reagan supported a gun-control measure because black panthers are running around the state legislature. it made it impossible to do that impose a waiting period on the time you needed people to apply for a handgun and actually being able to buy. people say that law will certainly stop the black panth
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 9:00am EDT
? i actually didn't get an offer for my first job so let's just get the introduction changed a little bit. [laughter] i happily attended stanford law school, and in the process, i met my husband to be, john o'connor, and he was a year behind me in law school. we decided to get married, and i graduated from the law school and we both liked to eat, and that meant one of us is going to have to work come in since i was out of law school, that was me. and i thought no problem getting a job. there were at least 40 notices on stanford's bulletin board at the law school, from law firms in california saying stanford law graduates, we have this, we would be happy to talk to you about job opportunities, give us a call. there were 40 different messages from different law firms in california on the bulletin board. so i called every one of those notices. not a single one would even give me an interview. i said why? they said we don't hire women. and that was the way it was. i got out of law school i just about 1952, but isn't that amazing? they wouldn't even talk. and i really did need to get a job
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2013 4:30pm EST
that was a memorable trip for him because on that ship there was a figure who would change his life, and his name was lieutenant commander snake thompson. many people used to say that man didn't really exist, but he did. he was a real figure, and he was -- part of his assignment in the navy. he had been a spy in japan and he was also a cat fancier. he was responsible for introducing burmese cats. he was a fascinating figure. he actually trained cats with according to ron. and he had a trained cat named psycho -- [laughter] anyway. young ron hub bard was on the ship coming through the panel canal on the way to washington, and snake william had just been vienna to talk to freud. he was writing an account for the navy. it had to do with the mental health of veterans and serving military personnel. he had gone to vienna to learn what he could from freud. he brought some of the was in to the information to the young man. when they arrive in washington, a couple of things happen. he is a boy scout. he claimed to be the youngest eagle scout ever. regardless of his merits in that regard, he
CSPAN
Mar 10, 2013 11:00pm EDT
changing the city and the land to preserve it in some ways even if it is an active imagination in many cases a creativity. i am going to read you one last section from the book because the only reason i know randel has to do with just i grew up in new york city what happens in a place for a long time in the early years of time sort of come to inhabit us and we see things are around us in a very different way. i'm going to read the last passage and then i would like to take questions. the garden in the machine is part of the national movement to lay down the country's infrastructure. part of the necessary network of internal improvements duquette for the land, of some of that settlement commerce and industry. they were among the agents bringing them into the garden she is a stretch traveling across the suburban and industrialized landscape. it's become house the commission has noted the garden in the machine. they've become significant recreational rats. many old railroad lines have become trails through the road and urban living. the high line which clattered between factories and ware
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 10:30am EDT
success it produces are quite familiar. and in both cases the world has changed forever because of it. ernest is a distinguished professor of humanities at the university of tennessee. his documentaries are heard on public radio, and he lectures frequently for the organization of american historians. please join me in welcoming ernest freeberg. [applause] >> welcome to the museum. >> thanks. it's great to be here. >> we're thrilled to have you here. let's talk about what the book is not. what the book is not is, first of all, a biography of edison. >> right. >> it's not a discussion of the invention of electricity. it's not a discussion to have competition between edison and tesla which is a favorite subject around here. [laughter] but we're not going into that today. but what it is and what i love about it is it's a social and, to a great extent also, a technological history of the incandescent light and the enormous impact the lighting of america had on our society and on the world. >> that's right. and i think it's, in many ways, a foundation of the modern economy that we live in a
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2013 8:00am EST
, things that should not move across borders. and that changes over time. for example, the british effort to suppress the slave trade, the categorization of who was not a desirable person to cross our borders, duties and so on on tax, taxes and duties on tea and other things which, again, come and go. so andreas also tells us about the much broader and significant consequences of the notion of mugging. what's at issue is not whether just a certain quantity of drugs do or don't come across our borders, but the strengthening of federal policing institutions in general over the course of the centuries as a result to attempt smuggling. finally, the book's ambition is to put into historical perspective a variety of contemporary moral panics on illicit border crossings of various types. and those we know these pervasive images of chinese immigrants in boxcars, tunnels under the u.s. border from mexico with drugs running through them, trafficked women is the latest moral panic about women who have come across to truck stops and so on. so the notion that andreas is giving us is that prohibition i
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 3:30pm EDT
it and figuring out solutions to problems throughout their lives. i don't know if television change that or something. but benjamin franken was not the only one at this time. ben franklin is a serial inventor for one. he made his original fortune with a series of infusion pumps, including insulin pumps that allowed stations to receive medication around the clock. without having a nurse present. he also invented the wheelchair. he built this gyroscopic technology into it. and they said you might want a wheelchair to climate curbs or stairs. so he invented this very ingenious technology to do that. he's probably best known for the segway. it was built on the same technology as the wheelchair. i don't love you remember when the segway came out a number of years back, it was hailed as the future of transportation and it was going to change the way we live. unfortunately, a lot of big cities banned the use of them on sidewalks, for one. in warehouses they used them, i think amazon uses them in their warehouses. there are a lot of tours around the country. the technology is around. maybe
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2013 1:00am EDT
have even seen some results were the prosecutors have made certain changes in their decision making that are making the system more fair so that is one type of solution. for the misconduct that i talked about before we give prosecutors are withholding evidence, again, i mentioned the case and mccarthy, i was so surprised when the case came out because everybody was so surprised and i was not. what they did in the case had been swayed too often in our system, but the victims of that are usually poor and african-american, didn't quite make the news and we don't hear about it but it happens a lot. >> host: that's the duke lacrosse case? >> guest: that's the duke lacrosse case held with duplicative evidence. if that happens a lot and i talk about a quite a bit in my book. >> host: do you not think he should have been dismissed? >> guest: i think he should have been but i think a lot of other prosecutors should be, too. that is my point. the case got the attention ended because those men were well off, they were able to hire a top-notch defense team but because the it team of lawyers, th
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 1:40am EDT
even though public opinion changes radically from month to month the year-to-year germans were asked about their opinions of u.s. presidency george to view bush fell to the low of coal% but obama was elected and approval was 92% was that a population of haters? no. they to make discriminating judgments on the basis of how they assess the new leader of the same country so western europeans were unhappy with the leader they saw as an inarticulate proponent of unilateral action and who had a swagger in his step and not interested in their opinion and when the president left office in the new president seemed to be very good at articulating why it was in u.s. interest to be a multi a latterly, seek cooperation with other countries and embody a set of ideals about america as the united states is a land of opportunity all of a sudden it was very popular so there is not the deep and underlying consistent hatred of united states but it is rare. but foreigners can make distinguishing judgments of different aspects and behave accordingly. >>host: why should we care which germans think? when is
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 1:30pm EDT
. suddenly, everything changed. the embers turned into fire and the whole thing was blowing again on them. they didn't know quite why it was doing now. but it created a very dangerous situation. so they called for everyone to come back to the engines for accountability. so that they knew where other people were. so you are breathing in ash and brick at this point. it is hot and dark. and you need to find out where your people are. they had trouble finding everybody. there is stuff on the radio. calls made by engine 57. very pretty. it is a little chaotic, it's in the book. i'm not going to try to reproduce it because it is just snatches of stuff. but obviously things are happening that the people can't do anything about because they have their own problems right there. so the worst of the fire passes. the fire at the double wide. the engines and the pumper wound up here because this was part of half the fire. this is bob. when he had deposited the three engines there, he left them and said i have to go check on things down the road. he didn't know if there was an engine down there. he dro
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2013 10:30am EST
i labored with the idea of reforming the existing institutions of the society. a little change here, a little change there. now i feel quite differently. think you've got -- i think you've got to have a reconstruction of the entire society, a revolution of values. frustrated by white resistance to addressing in any meaningful way decaying ghettos, failing schools, structural joblessness and crippling poverty, king told his staff at the southern christian leadership conference, quote: the dispossessed of this nation, the poor both white and negro live in a cruelly unjust society. they must organize a revolution against that injustice. not against the lives of their fellow citizens, but against the structures through which the society is refusing to lift the load of poverty. finish -- so what would king think of us today, of the world we have created in his absence? would he believe that the nonviolent revolution had already been won? had even begun? the revolution of values that he prayed for? would he, if he could see us today, believe that we now share his dream, that we are now tr
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 7:30pm EDT
years back it was hailed as the future of transportation coming out what's going to change the way he lived. unfortunately a lot of the big cities ban their use on sidewalks for one. they are still in use obviously. i think amazon uses them in the warehouses, and there are a lot of segue to worse around the country if she were in a city you can take a tour of the city in the sec'y. this technology is around, and maybe it will have bigger use in the future. the point is interesting is that he actually became a wealthy off of his inventions but if you look at sort of, you know, how they track over time you couldn't necessarily put them all together and say that is exactly what he was doing and in fact the way he got into it is by building these sort of light shows that were synchronized and music and he was able to see some of the technology as a teenager actually at planetarium in new york. i actually talk about thomas edison and the book. of course, you know, the inventor of the century, you know, he was hailed again the same issue with our franklin as he raised the issue is so high p
CSPAN
Mar 3, 2013 9:30am EST
report it has changed so much for just that he had that remarkable combination of the human touch in the extraordinary writing skills. he had the kind of credibility that the generals had to acknowledge. they couldn't ignore the common soldier. the story without error. it totally unclever as the war. it was a do or die time anyways and important war to end up lasting legacy of telling a story in a way people could connect with and remember humanize the people who force the politicians who might've wanted to move quickly to other things. they have been so many people trusted in ways that they didn't trace the generals in the politicians. he force to be reckoned with. these are the things he would tell me not even try to understand. to you at home there figures or one that went to and just didn't come back. you didn't see hemlines so grotesque and pasty besides the gravel road and france. we saw him by the. that's the difference. >> welcome to bookworks. we are here in albuquerque, new mexico a few miles north of old town and just off the 40 on the rio grande. the store opened in 19
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 9:15am EDT
. and the economy has changed since the 1930s but unions have not. unions don't see it that way. unions see them offer a product that is perfectly fine and the only problem is employees and lawyers aren't buying it. and to reverse its decline, not to design their offerings are making in members of more relevant to the twenty-first century workers but by making the difficult for employees and employers to define their services. this is what we have seen with the national labor relations board. and in less than three weeks forcing workers to decide in as little as 18 days. and allow them to form unions for their supporters, employees who do not decide to unionize to the side of their workplace will get unionized. not just at the board level. and organizing campaigns and unions are moving more and more towards direction to pressure an employer to accept union organizing rather than persuade union employees that a union is in their best interests and that is not just me saying that. that is the words of union organizers. consider the former secretary-treasurer, united food and comme
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 12:00pm EDT
between citizens and police really changed once police had to start ticketing people for driving or making arrests for people who were drinking liquor. alcohol was banned in virginia a few years before national legislation was passed. there were people who believed that if they could just go out onto a poet in the potomac and consume liquor, then that was not illegal because they weren't technically in virginia. earlier the alexandria police department didn't need a lot of vehicles. they didn't need a lot of motorcycles. it was a pretty small area they were responsible for patrolling, and so to see the size of alexandria double and then double again in a matter of pretty much 20 years really changed the department, increased staffing, more vehicles and then, ultimately, they had to move to a new police station pause they just couldn't fit in their original station house. one of the stories that i found really interesting is how officers began enforcing speed limits because, like, for the first 40 some years of the police force they didn't have cars. they had foot or emergency situat
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 4:30pm EDT
next three or four years. and then he will go through changes. and they basically self-taught for all that stuff. doctors are not very keen on paying for academic education. the state obviously isn't very keen on that. and so the industry steps in and the industry spends one doctor education than anybody else does. so they talk about it by industry and the people who make it. i think it should be irrelevant and okay to talk about it. but we have rdc and if you get regulations and whether they actually work. but of course when you send mystery shoppers along, a little bit line is not outright lying. and it's a really interesting thing to grasp. sort of understanding the moral framework in which all of this is happening. and then we have these hospitals. here we go. [inaudible] still up on the pill hill, i would guess that -- [laughter] there would be one clinic where there were three doctors and let's say two of them have some generic drugs that are pretty cheap. and there will be one doctor the bases things on a reasonable mixture. on the one doctor will say it actually think that
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 12:15am EDT
simple changes that i think need to be done. john i would like your opinion. did i miss anything in my presentation? >> no. i think the one thing is that coming from the naval war college, i am part of the too is the gold standard for all the schools you know and we still have all these problems. i agree with you fully that none of this is fixable without a will to to do it. wewe are not talking about much money at all. it's not a question of might, it's a question of will and i think it also has a lot to do with how important the services and congress think pme is. does it meets the larger goal and i don't think we can emphasize enough that as long as there is a lack of rigor in forced upon the students the message is -- at the end of the day. >> yes, question here. >> this is a clarification that leads to a question. i don't understand the full context. i understood you to say that it's mandated and mandated by congress and these people are going from tactical military operations to washington which i assume means more policy. the people that do this selected from within their milita
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 1:00pm EDT
incentive for them to sort of change those practices because there's no punishment, and that, i think, is one of the improvements we have to make if we want to see the changes. >> host: booktv at american university talking with law professor angela j. davis, here's the book "arbitrary justice: the power of the american prosecutor," oxford university press is the publisher. professor davis, what do your colleagues on the prosecute side say about "arbitrary justice"? >> guest: when i wrote the book, i expected a big backlash from prosecutors, and, interestingly enough, i have not gotten that much of a backlash. what's interesting is a lot of friends who are former prosecutors are saying, yes, you know, you're right, that the this stuff happened. the current prosecutors, those i know who are saying that many of them are saying, yes, but the things we write about don't happen often, just a few bad apples, painting too broad a brush. i got that criticism. other prosecutors who admit the system encourages this behavior thing that what we need to do is we need to have more training for prosecut
CSPAN
Mar 30, 2013 9:00am EDT
full of crazy be next. change did they maintain a continuing involvement with the school? >> most of them would be reunions. almost every year now. i think it has done that pretty regularly. did she really? and tom also comes to vote reunions now and then. he kept sporadic touch with the school. and elliott kept touch with the school until the 1918s and just felt people and classmates turned their back on them. so yes, she hasn't been back in a long time. in the mid 90s, a 50th anniversary commemorative book. everybody submitted their memories. and i remember the arts were fabulous. and they departed and i hated everything about the politics and hope that is gone now and as for everything else it caused a tremendous uproar when it was published and people were beside themselves and highly angry terms and elliot has always been able to drive his classmates crazy and by extension the entire sort of left wing community crazy and a role that he relished. >> in all of these years of research what was the most surprising thing you found about one of the three characters are what details di
CSPAN
Mar 2, 2013 1:30pm EST
did not have the freedom. >> that did not have the freedom in 1776 either. so what's changed in 1782 temecula soulful? >> yes. >> revolution that ended and nothing changed. question everybody here that? in march for 1776, independence is about to be declared. but it has not been yet. anything is possible. she wrote this, the boston people will appreciate this. just a couple of weeks after evacuation day. holidays. the rest of us to stop understand. but it is the day that the british evacuated boston. and in the same letter she talked about how the birds are chirping. more swiftly than they ever had before. she is upbeat, but about independence. she knows that is coming send, as you can see from her first sentence, and she knows that just of this great victory, she is up in 1776. and i think you're right. think she is down, as the two of you said, in 1782 because the founding fathers of one the revolutionary war in, but the founding mother seventh. by this time every state except new hampshire and other resigned or totally started a new end with a new constitution, and none of those s
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 5:00pm EDT
. [inaudible] >> how did this change my relationship with my modern sound? it didn't directly in the sense that they still blow caused the same way. i did use a rotary phone a few weeks ago and it's slow. i don't know how we ever dealt with that. the thing it did do was made me realize how much work went into getting the phone system we have, that we had then, that we have today. an incredible amount of work. it's also interesting that i listen now to a whole bunch of old tape recordings of telephone calls in the 1960s. you hit send on your phone and were used to call going through but then a second or so. back then and maybe 15, 20 or longer think any of your clicks and calling some circus are noisy. the calls had more character then. in contrast today -- what -- the call dropped. we have that. [inaudible] [laughter] >> i've had for anything. so i appreciate both the modern conveniences and also build on the qualities of the old network. >> put together a breakouts if they broke up at&t before they put together -- >> say it again. >> they put together this entire system if the phone compa
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 1:00pm EDT
come the technology is changing how we communicate. >> guest: yes and no. there's this assumption that the tape knowledge she had computers and mobile phones are changing the ways we write to each other because we're supposedly using abbreviations and acronyms and emoticons. if you're a young teenage girl you're using a blog. there may be a handful of these kinds of shorthand and emoticons commonly used. not nearly as many as the press would have you believe. what is changing is the way you read, the ways we write. i'll tell you what they mean by that in a second. our social relationships are changing incredibly and i'm going to suggest our personal individual psyches are changing. so let's start with how we read. it's pretty clear is what you read things on the screen, whether it's a laptop or even reader for tablet computer or mobile phone company don't go quite this family as you do when you read a hard copy. in fact, that's the subject of my next book. but what we know already is you tend to skim or worse to use the find function comes here when i'm just a word and you look at
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 7:00pm EDT
that. anniversary. obviously it is a statistic. that very, very you rare book that it actually changes people's lives. it actually change the culture. more recently only reflecting the lives of the people for not talking about working-class women who had no choice but to work along. and not talking about people sexual preferences may have already found themselves obscure . the what i want to do today a little bit is talk about the ongoing power of this. in the recently talked to my undergrads at nyu. some of whom are here in this audience who do not ever hesitate to tell me if something is boring, irrelevant. no longer worthy of their important attention. so it is actually kind of amazing to me that the class from pumps life. the book focuses on in really interesting ways. want to talk about the new feminine mystique. i want to talk about the old feminine mystique. it's complicated. we obviously live in a world that has been formed by both this book and the movement that followed it. most of us who were for an after the feminine mystique came out. it's hard enough to imagine those days
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 2:45pm EDT
is growing up, cleveland's relationship with her changes, changes from uncle cleve, the godfather, to a romantic interest. cleveland starts sending her letters with poems and sends her roses, and it's the full court press on courting her. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv. and now former florida governor jeb bush argues that the nation's immigration policy should be overhauled to reflect our current economic needs, but also should be b clear enough to enforce properly. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a par
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 10:00am EDT
technology in many species have changed since president reagan was in office, the important fundamentals, does this speak to where we as americans have not appeared every part yesterday yesterday, governor jeb bush understands this. it's one of the reasons after having left the office about six years ago he remains an extremely horrid national loosen the republican party. as we prepare to welcome the governor to this stage, let's first take stock of use that we know were of vital importance to ronald reagan and scrape them up against the word indeed as jeb bush on the same critical topics today. what are the fundamental issues? must begin with tax. we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut for the average american. he was convinced it is the man or woman on the street didn't understand their dollar more wisely than the federal government. when governor jeb bush was in office, he cut taxes some floridians $20 billion. let's talk about the size of government. when matt mccomas in the wake has house come he to medically reduce the rate of federal spending and strove to redu
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 3:45pm EDT
really it's that very, very rare book that one could make the argument that it actually changed people's lives and that it actually changed the culture. it's also come under criticism more recently, um, for not -- for only reflecting the lives of a very small group of people, for not talking about working class women who had no choice but to work all along and not talking about people of other sexual preferences who may have already found themselves kind of askew or outside of conventional life. but what i want to do today a little bit is talk about, um, the ongoing power of this classic. and i recently taught this book to my undergrads at nyu who, a couple of whom are in this audience, who do not ever hesitate to tell me if something is boring, irrelevant, dated, no longer worthy of their important attention. [laughter] so it was actually kind of amazing to me that in this class, the class really came to life, and the books sort of spoke to them, um n really interesting ways. so i want to talk about the new feminine mystiques that are oppressing us still, and i want to talk abo
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 8:00am EDT
provide an insurgent means to transform poverty, it didn't provide a way to change ghettoization, it didn't reach the full goals that the participants in the civil rights movement were really aspiring to of freedom, of power. and so what you had in the starting really in '66 it became a very big call was a question, black power. how do we build black power? there were dozens of organizations in most major cities asking this question and trying to thub it. think about it. there were a lot of different kinds of approaches. one important kind of theoretical answer to this was to say we're not just going to, you know, it's not that we just want to be part of america. america as it's constituted is an imperial power, and we need to challenge that imperialism as part and parcel of the colonial struggle not only in africa, but nationally. so there were organizations in the bay area asking that question on a small scale. one organization called the rove louis their action movement, both bobby seale and huey newton participated and drew a number of ideas from there, but there were different k
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 7:00am EDT
the 21st century so far, i itemized some of the incredible impressive changes just in the last 12 years, 12 or 13 years that have moved our society continuing in the direction of more social justice and more democracy. as you wil all know, martin lutr king had this great phrase, at the arc of history is long, but it bends towards justice. but what he did notice that somebody has to bend it. somebody has to take responsibility for moving the arc towards justice. the people that are wrote about in my book are the people who were the vendors of society. let me tell you about a few of them. then draw some lessons and give your quiz. i was in milwaukee about three or four months ago giving a talk at the university of wisconsin in milwaukee, and one of the great heroes in my book is a guy named victor berger. victor berger was the first socialist congressman, elected from milwaukee in 1911. and while he was in milwaukee he organized the labor movement and the socialist party take over the city government. they instituted some incredible changes which other cities replicated all over the
CSPAN
Mar 31, 2013 7:45pm EDT
revolutionary change in the world louseworts, revolutionary changes in terms of the way politics have shaped the sports that so many of us care about, yet you would never know that by reading the traditional sports media. anything you read the sports media and it reminds me of the old reporters to use to be normal was called the race speech for the new york times and 1950's and they would go down and cover that so rights movement and come back with the most insipid, juvenile, irrelevant stories of what they're seeing, like the quality of dr. martin the pickings suits . and so, how can you be expected to be a civic leader when he wears his baggy gray flannel suits that are so ill fitting. you read this. my god. you don't see what is happening right before your eyes. that is so much in the sports journalism today. before i talk about the revolution -- revolutionary changes i want to talk a little bit about sports journalism because i think most "-- sports journalism involves roughly three categories. the first is just, you could call it the us weekly. who is an athlete dating him what kind of
CSPAN
Mar 16, 2013 5:00pm EDT
the idea. several astonishing insights early on change their mind. the most erratic was a simple but important calculation of the scientists made showing that the tactics were a perfectly sensible approach. navy commander actually had a seemingly reasonable calculation themselves. they knew how much time elapsed between the moment when they spotted u-boat. they knew how fast they could go. so they multiply. they knew it was about 45 seconds that it typically had been out of sight by the time it actually got in position to drop it. they figured u-boat with the 150 people at the service at that point. so they said, okay. that is the best average. and the trouble was one that had been out of commission for five seconds also had time to take something out left to or right. so even though the charges were probably at the right depth on average, there were almost always wrong steps and missing targets. fewer than 1% of the u-boats are being successfully attacked. science has proposed an incredibly important change. they said change the setting from 150 feet to 25 feet. only attack coun
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